All posts in "Recommended Books"
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Real Food

By Clean Eating Online /

Real Food Book

 

 

Synopsis

Hailed as the “patron saint of farmers’ markets” by the Guardian and called one of the “great food activists” by Vanity Fair’s David Kamp, Nina Planck is single-handedly changing the way we view “real food.” A vital and original contribution to the hot debate about what to eat and why, Real Food is a thoroughly researched rebuttal to dietary fads and a clarion call for the return to old-fashioned foods.
 
In lively, personal chapters on produce, dairy, meat, fish, chocolate, and other real foods, Nina explains how ancient foods like beef and butter have been falsely accused, while industrial foods like corn syrup and soybean oil have created a triple epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. The New York Times said that Real Food “poses a convincing alternative to the prevailing dietary guidelines, even those treated as gospel,” and that “radical” as Nina’s ideas may be, the case she makes for them is “eminently sensible.”

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In Defense of Food

By Clean Eating Online /

Here’s the book that really opened my eyes to where our food comes from. This is fascinating reading. Anyone interested in clean eating should read this book.    Synopsis What to eat, what not to eat, and how to think about health: a manifesto for our times.   Biography Michael Pollan is a professor of […]

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The Omnivore’s Dillemma

By Clean Eating Online /

 

Synopsis

A New York Times bestseller that has changed the way readers view the ecology of eating, this revolutionary book by award winner Michael Pollan asks the seemingly simple question: What should we have for dinner? Tracing from source to table each of the food chains that sustain us – whether industrial or organic, alternative or processed – he develops a portrait of the American way of eating. The result is a sweeping, surprising exploration of the hungers that have shaped our evolution, and of the profound implications our food choices have for the health of our species and the future of our planet.

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Dirty Little Secrets

By Clean Eating Online /

I really liked this book. It’s an honest look at the complexities of motherhood told in a funny way.

 

Synopsis

Trisha Ashworth and Amy Nobile conducted interviews with hundreds of mothers while researching their best-selling book I Was a Really Good Mom Before I Had Kids. It didn’t take long before these moms began to reveal their Dirty Little Secrets—surprising, thought-provoking, guilty confessions they hadn’t told anyone else. Cringe-worthy moments (“I bit my daughter’s finger trying to steal a bite of her cookie.”) meet real insights (“I love my kids but I didn’t always. It took time to fall in love with them.”). These are the private thoughts that every mom has—and every mom can relate to.

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Kiddie Cookbook

By Clean Eating Online /

I love this cookbook. I used it all the time when my kids were just starting solid foods. It has all kinds of recipes for making organic baby food instead of feeding them that nasty stuff in a jar.

 

Synopsis

Fresh, wholesome meals that give little mouths something to smile about…

In The Petit Appetit Cookbook, mother and professional cook Lisa Barnes offers a healthy all-organic alternative to commercially processed, preservative-filled foods to help create delicious menus, nurture adventurous palates, and begin a lifetime of positive eating habits for children.

Includes:

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Animal, Vegetable, Miracle

By Clean Eating Online /

 

This book is excellent in explaining the whole locavore concept. It’s the story of a family who lived completely on only locally grown foods for one year.

Synopsis

Bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver describes her family’s adventure as they move to a farm in southern Appalachia and realign their lives with the local food chain.

When Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. “Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we’d know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them.”